Nutrition Guide

Seafood. Fish and shellfish are famed for being high in protein and low in saturated fat. To help benefit heart health, eat seafood at least twice a week.
nutrition information
Barramundi
Barramundi
A mild, lean type of seabass, with a meaty texture that’s surprisingly full of omega-3s, but with half the calories of salmon. Delicious grilled, baked or broiled, try barramundi in spicy fish tacos, too.
Catfish
Catfish
Mild and sweet with a flaky texture, catfish is packed with protein and a good source of selenium, an antioxidant that helps protect body cells from damage. For a healthier alternative to deep-frying, dredge fillets in a pecan coating and bake.
Cod and Haddock
Cod and Haddock
Mild-flavored and low in fat, cod and haddock contain vitamin B12, important for healthy red blood cells. Both fish readily take on added flavors from spices or marinades, making them among the most versatile fish around. Poach, steam, broil or grill—and be careful not to overcook.
Crab
Crab
Cracking with zinc and vitamin C, both essential for healthy body cells. Size and appearance differ by type, but crabmeat is low in fat, despite its rich and delicious taste. Enjoy crab in seafood dishes, dipped in vinaigrette or splashed with lemon juice.
Halibut
Halibut
Most often sold as steaks, this firm white fish boasts selenium, an antioxidant that helps protect body cells from damage. Try halibut kabobs: thread marinated chunks of fish and veggies onto skewers, then grill.
Mahi Mahi
Mahi Mahi
A sweet, mild flavor and lean nutrition profile make this a fish everyone’s sure to love. Plus, it’s a source of niacin, which helps produce energy in body cells. Try it blackened: pat fillets with creole spice rub, pan-fry in a hot skillet and top with fruit salsa.
Mollusks
Mollusks
Clams, mussels and oysters offer a slightly salty yet sweet flavor plus selenium, vitamin B12 and iron. Iron is a mineral that helps the blood carry oxygen to body cells. Steam mollusks in their shells or add their lean, tender meat to soups, fish stews and pasta dishes.
Salmon
Salmon
Rich in protein, salmon also supplies omega-3 fatty acids, which may help benefit heart health. Bake, poach, grill or microwave salmon fillets and steaks, toss into salads and pastas, or shape into salmon burgers.
Scallops
Scallops
Sweet and delicate in flavor, scallops are low in fat and high in vitamin B12. This vitamin helps the body make healthy red blood cells. To keep scallops tender, cook just until they’re no longer translucent. Sauté, broil, grill, simmer in fish stew or add to pasta.
Shrimp
Shrimp
High in protein and low in saturated fat. Contains 130 mg cholesterol per 3 oz. serving, but fits into a healthy diet when total cholesterol intake is less than 300 mg daily. Toss sautéed shrimp into pasta and salads or skewer on kabobs and grill.
Snapper
Snapper
One of the most popular of all white fish, snapper’s firm texture and sweet nutty flavor are ideal for a variety of cooking methods and ethnic flavors—all for just 1.5 grams of fat per 3 oz. serving. Enjoy snapper steamed with black bean sauce or pan-seared with an Asian-inspired sauce.
Swai
Swai
This economical white-flesh fish is sweet and mild-tasting with a light, flaky texture—and plenty of protein, too. Prepare simply: broil or grill, then top with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and a sprinkling of chopped parsley.
Tilapia, Flounder and Sole
Tilapia, Flounder and Sole
These lean, protein-packed fish offer mild, sweet flavor and tender, flaky texture. Simple preparations are best: sauté, bake or broil. Try them en papillote: place fish, chopped vegetables and herbs in a parchment or aluminum foil packet and bake.
Tuna
Tuna
Delicious seared, broiled or grilled, tuna is rich in vitamin B6, which helps the body fight infection. It also supplies omega-3 fatty acids, which may benefit heart health. Try tuna steaks topped with fruit salsa, dry-rubbed with spices, or marinated in an Asian-style dressing.